The Foundation encourages Grantee to publicize its Grant and broadly disseminate Project results.

If production of a publication is part of the grant agreement, Grantee may format the publication using its own templates and branding while acknowledging the Foundation’s support as follows: “Funded by a grant from the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health, Palo Alto, California,” along with the Foundation’s logo and a link to the Foundation website. The publication also must include this language: “Support for this research was provided by the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health. The views presented here are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the Foundation or its directors, officers or staff.”

Alternatively, the Foundation may format the publication using its template and branding and acknowledging that the work was completed by Grantee, including Grantee logo and website link. The decision about which organization will format the publication will be made at the time the grant is awarded.

For some Projects, the Project Director and the Program Officer may determine that the Grantee and the Foundation should mutually develop the publication content. In such cases, Grantee will develop an initial draft and at least one subsequent draft responding to the Foundation’s comments. Project Director and Program Officer will jointly determine which organization will produce the product.

Foundation publications generally fall into three categories: Reports, Issue Briefs and Fact Sheets.

Reports

Reports provide the opportunity to cover a topic in depth. Elements include:

  • Cover
  • Table of Contents
  • Author biographies
  • About the organization
  • About the foundation (see Foundation style guide)
  • Abstract
  • Executive Summary
  • Introduction, Background and Findings
  • Methodology if applicable
  • Policy recommendations and outline of potential next steps
  • Endnotes
  • Appendices
  • A "References" or "Bibliography" section

Use of charts, tables, graphs, illustrations, pull-out quotes and other visual elements is encouraged.

The Report should total no more than 5000 words excluding table of contents, biographies, about the organization, about the foundation, abstract, endnotes, tables, figures, appendices and references.

Click here for an example of a Report (PDF). It may also be helpful to know how the report will be displayed on our website. Click here for an example of a Report Page.

Issue Briefs

Issue Briefs generally focus on a specific topic and related policy recommendations. Elements include:

  • Abstract
  • Brief Introduction and Findings
  • Policy recommendations and potential next steps
  • About the author(s)
  • Endnotes/citations
  • A "References" or "Bibliography" section

Use of charts, tables, graphs, illustrations, pull-out quotes and other visual elements is encouraged.

Issue Briefs should total no more than 3000 words, excluding about the author(s), endnotes/citations and reference/bibliography

Click here for an example of an Issue Brief (PDF). It may also be helpful to know how the issue brief will be displayed on our website. Click here for an example of an Issue Brief Page.

Fact Sheets

Fact sheets provide a brief summary of a specific issue and offer policy recommendations. Fact Sheets should total no more than 700 words. Elements include:

  • Summary of the issue
  • Policy recommendations
  • Author(s), affiliation(s) and email(s)

Click here for an example of a Fact Sheet (PDF). It may also be helpful to know how the issue brief will be displayed on our website. Click here for an example of a Fact Sheet Page.

For Publications Formatted by the Foundation

Grantee will submit a Word document with minimal styling, limited to subheads and bullets.

When charts are included in a report, provide the original data file in which the chart was created, such as an Excel spreadsheet. When custom graphics are included, provide the original image or graphic file.

  • Type size in the Word document should be equivalent to 12 point Times New Roman
  • Do not use first person
  • Define all abbreviations and acronyms on first use and try to limit their use throughout the paper
  • Avoid jargon and define terms that a general reader might not recognize
  • Provide logos, a brief description of the organization, and author biographies. Potential cover images may be submitted.