• The ‘Hidden Health Care System’ in California Schools and Children with Special Health Care Needs

    Health services for California students with special health care needs vary greatly by school district, are provided by a variety of school staff, operate under a confusing patchwork of regulations, and are often underfunded, according to a new study. Researchers from California State University-Sacramento’s School of Nursing analyzed 2011-2012 state education data, interviewed school education experts, and conducted a large-scale survey of certified school nurses who are members of the California School Nurses Association.

  • Children with Special Health Care Needs and Managed Care: Approaches from Three States

    For families of children with special health care needs, the idea of managed care can be worrisome. Families fear that in the interest of cost savings and maximizing profits health plans will limit their children's care. A new study by the National Academy for State Health Policy, supported by the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health, examines how three states, including California, try to ensure that children with special health care needs are identified in managed care organizations and that their needs are assessed and appropriate care provided. The authors propose promising practices that states could adopt to meet the requirements of this population of children.

  • ITUP: Children’s Health Coverage Under the ACA

    This series of issue briefs, prepared by the Insure the Uninsured Project and funded by the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health, examines the impact of the Affordable Care Act on health insurance coverage for children in California, and offers recommendations on how the state might alter existing programs and systems to better serve children.

  • Next Steps Toward Care Coordination

    A recent survey indicates that California’s fragmented system of care is the main barrier to effective care coordination.

  • Teaching Families to Fish: How to Support Families as Care Coordinators

    What would care coordination look like if families received support and training for their role as principal care coordinators for their child with special health care needs? A new issue brief from the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health proposes a series of attributes that would characterize true family-centered care coordination. 

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