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    Models of Care Delivery for Children with Medical Complexity

    Novel care delivery models in which care coordination and other services to children with medical complexity are provided are a focus of national and local health care and policy initiatives. This article explores the rapid proliferation in the creation of new models and examines their unique advantages and disadvantages.

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    Status Complexicus? The Emergence of Pediatric Complex Care

    Increased attention to children with medical complexity has occurred because these children are growing in impact, represent a disproportionate share of health system costs, and require policy and programmatic interventions that differ in many ways from broader groups of children with special health care needs. As an emerging field, pediatric care systems should thoughtfully and rapidly develop evidence-based solutions to improve care.

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    Care Coordination for Children with Medical Complexity: Whose Care Is It, Anyway?

    Dedicated care coordination is increasingly seen as key to addressing the fragmented care that children with medical complexity often encounter. Authors discuss the need for infrastructure building, design and implementation leadership, use of care coordination tools and training modules, and appropriate resource allocation under new payment models.

  • Cover of Aligning Services with Needs Report

    Aligning Services with Needs: Characterizing the Pyramid of Complexity Tiering for Children with Chronic and Complex Conditions

    Health care systems are increasingly using a process known as "risk tiering" to group patients with similar degrees of need for health care and care coordination services. Families and care providers of children with chronic and complex conditions should understand the risk tiering process, as it may affect access to services these children need. This report outlines how tiering currently is being used, and makes recommendations for policy and research. 

  • HMA Report Cover

    How Interagency, Cross-Sector Collaboration Can Improve Care for CSHCN: Lessons from Six State Initiatives

    Children and youth with special needs are best served through a coordinated approach across the myriad programs and agencies whose services they need.  In two new reports, Health Management Associates highlights how six programs in five states have made progress in overcoming the frustrating barriers to interagency collaboration among programs that serve these children and their families. The reports offer recommendations on how states might foster efforts to improve communication and coordination across programs and reduce fragmentation and duplication of services. 

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    Why Becoming a Good Parent Begins in Infancy: How Relationship Skills Are Developed throughout the Life Course

    Learning social skills is a cumulative, lifelong task that can have a profound effect on many aspects of an individual’s life. Social skills can be taught and reinforced at all ages and in numerous social settings. Greater attention to supporting the kinds of social interactions that improve relationships can contribute to individual growth and a more equitable and just society.

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