• Habilitative Services Under the ACA: What States Should Consider

    Habilitative services, which help a person keep, learn or improve skills and functioning for daily living, are essential for many children with special health care needs. Under the Affordable Care Act, states will play a primary role in determining which services are covered. This paper outlines key factors states should keep in mind as they make their decisions.

  • Habilitative Services Coverage for Children Under the Essential Health Benefit Provisions of the Affordable Care Act

    Sara Rosenbaum, the Harold and Jane Hirsh Professor of Health Law and Policy at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services, analyzes how habilitative services may be covered under the Essential Health Benefits Provisions of the Affordable Care Act.  The author notes that states will play a primary role in determining Essential Health Benefits, and that establishing state standards for health insurance plans sold in the individual and small group markets will be key to health policy for children with disabilities.

  • Assuring Children’s Access to Pediatric Subspecialty Care in California

    This policy note, prepared by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research and funded by the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health, explores disparities in access to pediatric subspecialty care in California by insurance coverage, geographic location, race/ethnicity, and language. The paper proposes recommendations to ensure adequate access to pediatric subspecialty care.

  • Children with Special Health Care Needs in California: A Profile of Key Issues

    Compared to children in other states, California’s children with special health care needs receive care that is less coordinated, less family-centered, and fails to meet many of the key quality indicators prescribed by the Federal Maternal and Child Health Bureau, according to this new analysis of the  2009/10 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs.

  • California's Diminishing Resource: Children

    A report released today by the USC Price School of Public Policy and the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health indicates that an unprecedented decline in California’s child population, coupled with a tidal wave of Baby Boom retirees, will pose significant challenges for the state’s future prosperity.

Pages

Filter by