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    Achieving Care Integration for Children with Medical Complexity: The Human-Centered Design Approach to Care Coordination

    Taking a fresh look at the perennial issue of how to provide effective care coordination, a team of researchers has reimagined the process using human-centered design, an approach that focuses on the users’ needs. The goal is to integrate all sectors of care and support – medical, educational, financial and other services – so that care can be delivered effectively and better meet the needs of children, families, providers, and payers.

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    Parent Survey: Most Valuable Components of Medical Home

    The evidence is clear that care in a pediatric medical home results in improved health outcomes, increased family satisfaction, and decreased cost of care. A statewide survey queried California parents on which components of a medical home they most value, and how satisfied they are with the care their child receives. 

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    Recommendations for Value-Based Transition Payment for Pediatric and Adult Health Care Systems

    The critical handoff from pediatric to adult care providers often fails to occur, in part because no payment mechanisms are available to either practice. To address this, the National Alliance to Advance Adolescent Health convened a multidisciplinary group of stakeholders to develop recommendations for pediatric-to-adult transition value-based payment (VBP) strategies and quality measures. Their findings are outlined in this new report.

  • A Better Way: Team Care for Children with Special Health Care Needs

    Team-based health care is a key component of the Chronic Care Model, which has shown to be successful for adults with chronic conditions.  As the number of children with chronic conditions grows, and payers seek innovative ways to increase efficiency and effectiveness, it may be time to invest in restructuring pediatric practice to promote team-based care. 

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    Models of Care Delivery for Children with Medical Complexity

    Novel care delivery models in which care coordination and other services to children with medical complexity are provided are a focus of national and local health care and policy initiatives. This article explores the rapid proliferation in the creation of new models and examines their unique advantages and disadvantages.

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    Care Coordination for Children with Medical Complexity: Whose Care Is It, Anyway?

    Dedicated care coordination is increasingly seen as key to addressing the fragmented care that children with medical complexity often encounter. Authors discuss the need for infrastructure building, design and implementation leadership, use of care coordination tools and training modules, and appropriate resource allocation under new payment models.

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    Status Complexicus? The Emergence of Pediatric Complex Care

    Increased attention to children with medical complexity has occurred because these children are growing in impact, represent a disproportionate share of health system costs, and require policy and programmatic interventions that differ in many ways from broader groups of children with special health care needs. As an emerging field, pediatric care systems should thoughtfully and rapidly develop evidence-based solutions to improve care.

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    Supporting Self-Management in Children and Adolescents with Complex Chronic Conditions

    Self-management improves health outcomes in chronic illness not only by improving adherence to the treatment plan but also by building the individual’s capacity to navigate challenges and solve problems. This article discusses the need for clinicians to have standardized approaches and tools to assess and promote self-management for youth and adolescents.

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    Evolving Federal and State Health Care Policy: Toward a More Integrated and Comprehensive Care-Delivery System for Children with Medical Complexity

    Alternative payment models promote novel care-delivery systems and greater accountability for health outcomes With a focus on population health, patient-centered medical homes, and care coordination, this model holds the potential to promote care-delivery systems that address the unique needs of children with medical complexity, including nonmedical needs and the social determinants of health.

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