• A Better Way: Team Care for Children with Special Health Care Needs

    Team-based health care is a key component of the Chronic Care Model, which has shown to be successful for adults with chronic conditions.  As the number of children with chronic conditions grows, and payers seek innovative ways to increase efficiency and effectiveness, it may be time to invest in restructuring pediatric practice to promote team-based care. 

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    How California Children’s Services Programs in the 21 Whole-Child Model Counties Engage with Families

    When families are engaged in their children’s care – including being provided with the support necessary to allow meaningful participation – health care systems improve, the quality of care improves, and children and families are better served. This brief analyzes results from a survey of county CCS administrators on how families are currently engaged in their programs, and provides suggestions for how family roles could be enhanced.

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    Families of Children With Medical Complexity: A View From the Front Lines

    Families authentically involved at every level of health care systems are critical partners in designing policies and systems that will improve care for children with medical complexity. Written by a group of parents, this article provides an overview of the demands of managing care from their unique perspective.

  • Family Engagement and Leadership in Title V Programs

    In 2014 and 2015, the Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs conducted a survey about family engagement policies and practices in federally funded Title V maternal and child health programs and programs for children and youth with special health care needs. The findings provide a snapshot of strategies to support meaningful family engagement, effective and innovative practices, and areas of need for improvement and technical assistance.

  • Creating and Sustaining Effective Hospital Family Advisory Councils

    Establishing Family Advisory Councils (FACs) in children's hospitals is one means of ensuring that families have a strong voice regarding the care delivered to their children. To encourage development of FACs that truly have an impact, the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health provided grant funding for the formation of the California Patient & Family Centered Care Network, a statewide collaborative composed of parents and providers representing 15 pediatric hospitals and clinics. A new report summarizes the work of the Network, and offers guidelines for establishing effective FACs.
  • A Guide to Establishing Effective Hospital Family Advisory Councils

    When families feel that they are partners with their children's health care providers, the quality of care improves and parents' fears and anxieties are reduced. One means of ensuring that families have a strong voice regarding their children's care is establishment of Family Advisory Councils (FACs) in health care organizations. The California Patient & Family Centered Care Network, a statewide collaborative composed of parents and providers representing 15 pediatric hospitals and clinics, has developed a checklist for establishing effective Councils.

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