• Challenges and Joys: Pediatricians Reflect on Caring for Children with Special Health Care Needs

    Children with special health care needs (CSHCN) fare better when they are cared for in a "medical home," yet only a small percentage receive such care. In a series of focus groups and interviews, California pediatricians and other key informants discuss their views on caring for CSHCN, and their ideas about how system changes could enhance their willingness to provide a medical home.

  • Family Engagement and Leadership in Title V Programs

    In 2014 and 2015, the Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs conducted a survey about family engagement policies and practices in federally funded Title V maternal and child health programs and programs for children and youth with special health care needs. The findings provide a snapshot of strategies to support meaningful family engagement, effective and innovative practices, and areas of need for improvement and technical assistance.

  • An Experiment in Local Care Coordination: Lessons Learned from Phase I of the California Community Care Coordination Collaborative

    In 2013, the Foundation launched the California Community Care Coordination Collaborative (5Cs) to test whether agencies serving children with special health care needs and their families could be brought together to improve local care coordination and promote needed system changes. A new report takes a look at the results of the first 18 months of the project.

  • Telehealth Policy Solutions for Children with Complex Medical Needs

    Telehealth has proven to be an effective tool in making specialized care more accessible for children and youth with special health care needs, but in California providers and families are not using this service to its full potential, according to a new report.

  • Realizing the Promise of Telehealth for Children with Special Health Care Needs

    Telehealth—the use of technology to provide and coordinate health care at a distance—has proven to be an effective tool in making specialized care more accessible for children and youth with special health care needs, but in California providers and families are not using this service to its full potential. A new report explores the barriers to use and proposes some solutions.

  • Project Leadership: Effecting Change, One Parent at a Time

    Families of children with special health care needs have real-world experience that could help make health care policies more family-centered and culturally competent. However, many lack the training and confidence to make their voices heard. Project Leadership, operated by Family Voices of California, offers a comprehensive training curriculum and mentoring program that prepares families to engage in public policy advocacy.

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