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    Survey Compares Adult and Pediatric Chronic Condition Management in Primary Care Practices

    Though most commonly associated with adults, chronic care management is becoming increasingly important in pediatric practices as the number of children with complex chronic conditions continues to grow. As the need for smooth transition of these patients from pediatric to adult care is increasing, a new analysis sheds some light on the differences between pediatric and adult internal medicine practices.

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    The Future of Pediatrics: Redefining Chronic Care

    “Chronic” is a way of providing health care that is too often limited to patients with chronic medical conditions. In a new issue brief, Edward Schor, MD, proposes a definition of chronic care and describes how it should be the care model used not only for children with special health care needs but also for well-child care. Both are intended to promote lifelong health.

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    Parent Survey: Most Valuable Components of Medical Home

    The evidence is clear that care in a pediatric medical home results in improved health outcomes, increased family satisfaction, and decreased cost of care. A statewide survey queried California parents on which components of a medical home they most value, and how satisfied they are with the care their child receives. 

  • A Better Way: Team Care for Children with Special Health Care Needs

    Team-based health care is a key component of the Chronic Care Model, which has shown to be successful for adults with chronic conditions.  As the number of children with chronic conditions grows, and payers seek innovative ways to increase efficiency and effectiveness, it may be time to invest in restructuring pediatric practice to promote team-based care. 

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    How California Children’s Services Programs in the 21 Whole-Child Model Counties Engage with Families

    When families are engaged in their children’s care – including being provided with the support necessary to allow meaningful participation – health care systems improve, the quality of care improves, and children and families are better served. This brief analyzes results from a survey of county CCS administrators on how families are currently engaged in their programs, and provides suggestions for how family roles could be enhanced.

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    Why Becoming a Good Parent Begins in Infancy: How Relationship Skills Are Developed throughout the Life Course

    Learning social skills is a cumulative, lifelong task that can have a profound effect on many aspects of an individual’s life. Social skills can be taught and reinforced at all ages and in numerous social settings. Greater attention to supporting the kinds of social interactions that improve relationships can contribute to individual growth and a more equitable and just society.

  • Challenges and Joys: Pediatricians Reflect on Caring for Children with Special Health Care Needs

    Children with special health care needs (CSHCN) fare better when they are cared for in a "medical home," yet only a small percentage receive such care. In a series of focus groups and interviews, California pediatricians and other key informants discuss their views on caring for CSHCN, and their ideas about how system changes could enhance their willingness to provide a medical home.

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