• Could a California-Specific Website Ease Transition to Adult Care?

    For young people with special health care needs, transitioning to the adult care system can be complicated. Thirty-nine states have websites to help youth and families with planning and support. California is not one of them. This brief outlines key components that a state-specific site for California might offer.

  • Key Components of a System for Publicly Financed Care of CSHCN in California

    The future of the California Children’s Services program has spawned numerous but often unfocused discussions. A new paper from Ed Schor, MD, senior vice president at the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health, attempts to organize and focus forthcoming discussions.  This issue brief is provided as a proposal to which stakeholders are encouraged to react.

  • A Triple Aim Approach to Transition from Pediatric to Adult Health Care for Youth with Special Health Care Needs

    More than 90% of children with chronic illness now survive into adulthood, which presents a range of challenges for individuals and for the system of care. This Issue Brief describes key unmet needs regarding a) developing chronic disease self-management skills; b) enhancing the capacity of the adult health care system to care for young adults with special health care needs; and c) reducing lapses in care during the transition period. The authors, fellows at the Stanford University Clinical Excellence Research Center, offer recommendations for improving the transition.

  • ITUP: Children’s Health Coverage Under the ACA

    This series of issue briefs, prepared by the Insure the Uninsured Project and funded by the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health, examines the impact of the Affordable Care Act on health insurance coverage for children in California, and offers recommendations on how the state might alter existing programs and systems to better serve children.

  • Next Steps Toward Care Coordination

    A recent survey indicates that California’s fragmented system of care is the main barrier to effective care coordination.

  • Teaching Families to Fish: How to Support Families as Care Coordinators

    What would care coordination look like if families received support and training for their role as principal care coordinators for their child with special health care needs? A new issue brief from the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health proposes a series of attributes that would characterize true family-centered care coordination. 

  • Private Coverage Under California’s Affordable Care Act: How Will Children with Special Health Care Needs Fare?

    High-end “platinum” coverage or basic catastrophic? In just a few months, many families of children with special health care needs must choose their level of health care coverage for 2014 under the Covered California Health Benefit Exchange. To make informed decisions, families will need to understand the benefits and markedly different cost-sharing requirements of the various products to be offered under the exchange plan. In this issue brief, Peggy McManus and Harriette Fox, of The National Alliance to Advance Adolescent Health, assesses the strengths and weaknesses of the proposed plan, and notes issues of particular concern for families of children with some special health care needs.

  • Habilitative Services Coverage for Children Under the Essential Health Benefit Provisions of the Affordable Care Act

    Sara Rosenbaum, the Harold and Jane Hirsh Professor of Health Law and Policy at the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services, analyzes how habilitative services may be covered under the Essential Health Benefits Provisions of the Affordable Care Act.  The author notes that states will play a primary role in determining Essential Health Benefits, and that establishing state standards for health insurance plans sold in the individual and small group markets will be key to health policy for children with disabilities.

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